The powerful voice of Anthony Anaxagorou [VIDEO]

Anthony Anaxagorou at the Young Writers’ Festival 2012 (UK)

I’d like to introduce to you a young man who is truly gifted in his ability to weave words in such a descriptive manner that the listener cannot ignore the profundity of his statements. Please Google Anthony Anaxagorou and listen and read his work. This young man is truly Superbad. Listen to the Truth. Share. Please.



This is Not a Poem and I Am Not a Poet. Wow. If this doesn’t move you or at least make you think then you have no heart. 



Photo: Richard Budd


The Perils of Blackness: Good Hair...Bad Hair...Now 'Nasty' Hair?


Sheryl Underwood Tiana Parker
A firestorm was unleashed when comedian Sheryl Underwood (top) made disparaging remarks about natural hair and a little girl in Tulsa, OK (bottom) changed schools because of her hair

I finally saw the clip of Sheryl Underwood’s comments about black folks' natural hair. I now understand why she was ragged on so much on Twitter and was nearly in tears in her apology on Steve Harvey's radio show. Underwood tried to chalk the situation up to a joke gone wrong but her statements were so incredibly hurtful and psychologically damaging it may take some time for her to get this behind her.

It doesn't help that Steve Harvey, in his attempt to support his friend Underwood, referred to the incident as "the little thing going on about the hair comment." Oh, no, the hair comments are not a little thing or Underwood wouldn't have realized such a backlash. Hair is a very sensitive issue for black people. Underwood could have let it go after after one remark, but no, she continued the black hair beatdown when other women on the panel were trying to move the conversation on.  


Lest we forget, while black folk are busy being angry with Sheryl Underwood, be mindful that Aisha Tyler, another black woman on 'The Talk," sat at that same table and didn’t say a mumbling word. Tyler did look uncomfortable but she didn't do anything to ease the pain, so she doesn't get a pass. 

What’s the message sent about kinky, curly or wavy hair? It’s ugly ---- straighten it! Even white people feel the same way so let's put this issue in perspective. At this juncture, the dots in this controversy could be connected by a discussion on white supremacy and idolization white European beauty but I won't go there. I do ask you to pay more attention to the images and words in the media and in our daily conversations and internet interactions. 

Deborah Brown Community School, a charter school in Tulsa, OK bans ‘faddish’ hairstyles like dreadlocks, mohawks and afros. Consequently, Tiana Parker, a little 7 year-old black girl, was sent home because of her hair which she wore in locs. 


It’s understandable that a school wants its students to look presentable but come on, there was nothing wrong with that child’s hair. Tiana, a straight-A student, according to her father, wore her hair in this manner last year  and it wasn't a problem. The school decided to enforce their policy this school year.

Tiana Parker’s father has been lauded by many for removing her from the school rather than conforming to the school’s dress code policy. That’s all well and good but Deborah Brown Community School is a charter school, as such, can establish its own dress code policy --- even if it is ridiculous.  Why would the parent of a black child subject him or her to a psychologically terroristic environment that blatantly demonstrates disdain for a child's natural beauty? Even with the school's good academic performance reputation, I don't think so.

The most flack I’ve gotten about my hair, in its natural state, has been from other black people. White people usually want to touch it, especially when my hair was in locs. It’s so sad and I wonder if it will ever change since images of black women in natural hairstyles are a rarity even in media by, for and about blacks. Check it out for yourself.

Sheryl Underwood and the governing board and administration of Deborah Brown Community School are all black which makes this black hair drama all the more pathetic. Perhaps one day, EVERYONE, will appreciate their God-given beauty. In the meantime, I strongly encourage Underwood and the folks at Deborah Brown Community School to watch Chris Rock's documentary, Good Hair.



Broadcast premiere of controversial film ‘Dark Girls’ airs on OWN, 6/23, ABPSI and CHN provide solutions to dilemmas posed by the film


Watch the world television premiere of Dark Girls on OWN. Tune in Sunday, June 23, at 10/9c.

Dark Girls is a fascinating and controversial documentary film that goes underneath the surface to explore the prejudices that dark-skinned women face throughout the world. It explores the roots of classism, racism and the lack of self-esteem within a segment of cultures that span from America to the most remote corners of the globe. Women share their personal stories, touching on deeply ingrained beliefs and attitudes of society, while allowing generations to heal as they learn to love themselves for who they are.

The Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi) announced that, in response to a request from the Oprah Winfrey Network, it is providing resources to facilitate healing conversations about the ground-breaking film, Dark Girls, which will have its world television premiere on OWN on Sunday, June 23, 2013. ABPsi’s resources will be available at

In addition, ABPsi is providing information about its collaboration with the Community Healing Network (CHN), which is working to mobilize the Black community to overcome internalized beliefs about the inferiority of Black skin, Black hair, and other characteristics associated with people of African ancestry. 

Dark Girls explores the blows to self-esteem faced by dark-skinned women all over the world, and ABPsi psychologists have compiled a summary of the issues raised in the film and their psychological implications, emotional wellness tips, and links to helpful resources. 

To address the broad range of problems related to the idea of Black inferiority, ABPsi is working with CHN to create a network of self-help groups focused on emotional emancipation, healing, and wellness for Black people. ABPsi has developed a ground-breaking, research-based Emotional Emancipation (EE) Circles Toolkit and Curriculum in partnership with CHN, which will be available to the public in August 2013. EE Circles are safe, flexible gatherings in which Black people can come together to share stories, learn more about the impact of historical forces on emotions, and learn and practice essential emotional wellness skills. 

“We believe,” said Community Healing Network President Enola Aird, “that the only real solution to the problems illuminated in Dark Girls is a vibrant grassroots movement for the emotional emancipation of Black people, and it is our hope that EE Circles will be catalysts for personal reflection, dialogue, and action that will help heal, revitalize, and transform the Black community.” 

For more information, visit and



Related Links:

The Official Dark Girls Movie Website

Dark Girls



Waka Flocka, Voting and Crimes Against Our Children [VIDEO]

First there was T-Pain, now Waka Flocka. This video is sad on so many levels. I don't know who Waka Flocka is or what Waka Flocka means but I do know that here is a young man, obviously a celebrity since he's being interviewed on 106 & Park, who cannot hold an intelligent conversation. He could have been nervous but that doesn't explain the vocabulary and grammar issues.

It's easy to make jokes about this interview and some of the comments about this incident on YouTube are brutal but it's so not funny. From family to community to the educational system to the record company he works for --- this is so wrong. It's child abuse...neglect...fraud and a number of other charges we should be ashamed of as adults.

Artists like Waka Flocka are emulated by other young people, pushed through or kicked out of our educational system and neglected by family and community. Like many young people, he has potential but for whatever reason, we didn't nurture him. It's not too late for Waka Flocka and many other young people in our communities, so what are we going to do?

In case you forgot...

Get out and vote on November 2, 2010!

Carolyn House Stewart Installed as International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Carolyn_house_stewart ST. LOUIS, MO — Carolyn House Stewart of Tampa, Florida was sworn in as the 28th International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority during the Sorority's weeklong convention that was held in St. Louis. In ascending to the international presidency, she becomes the first lawyer to head the organization. She also makes history as the first president to serve a full term in the Sorority's second century.

As international president Mrs. Stewart will serve a four-year term from 2010-2014. She will guide policy, develop programs and set the leadership tone for Alpha Kappa Alpha, which was founded in 1908 at Howard University and is the largest and oldest organization of primarily African-American college-educated women in the world. Today, it boasts a diverse membership of 260,000 college-educated members in 975 chapters in the United States, the Caribbean, Canada, Germany, Korea, Japan and on the continent of Africa.

Attorney Stewart's ascension to Alpha Kappa Alpha's chief leadership position caps a 38-year record of commitment and service to Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority that began when she was initiated at the University of South Florida. On the national arena, she also served as Chairman of the Sorority's Program Committee, International Secretary and First Vice President.

Mrs. Stewart, who has enjoyed a 32-year career as an attorney, is a shareholder in the law firm of Macfarlane Ferguson & McMullen, one of Florida's oldest law firms. She received her juris doctor degree from the University of South Carolina Law Center and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of South Florida.

Under her administration, Alpha Kappa Alpha will launch a comprehensive program that will continue the Sorority's 102-year legacy of "providing service to all mankind."

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, which is headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, is the oldest and first Greek-letter organization founded by Black women and one of the world's leading service organizations. The Sorority's mission to "serve all mankind," is achieved through a comprehensive array of programs and advocacy initiatives. Its membership includes Dr. Mae C. Jemison, Alicia Keys, Eleanor Roosevelt, the late Coretta Scott King, the late Rosa Parks a host of political leaders and other luminaries.

For more information, log on to

Brainwashed: Black Inferiority/White Superiority [VIDEO]

Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority

“You’ve been misled. You been had. You been took.”  --- Malcolm X

Tom Burrell has written a powerful book, Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority, that exposes and explains why the black collective finds itself in a current condition of dysfunction. It was difficult to put this book down because Burrell’s perspective is different from many books on this same broad subject.

Burrell’s perspective as a marketing and public relations expert is straight forward, eye-opening and raw. Our mental conditioning must be addressed before blacks can ever realize true, substantive progress as a people.

Brainwashing is not just a victimization of blacks although blacks seem to be the most damaged by it. Whites have been brainwashed, as have women, men, Latinos, Asians, etc., etc., etc. Pick a group, any group and you have been brainwashed too.

Shout out to Roland Martin of the Tom Joyner Morning Show for interviewing Tom Burrell and turning me on to this book. I've purchased a few as gifts. We'll discuss this book in more detail. Get a copy and Stop the Brainwash!


Akira’s Hip Hop Shop: A Love Story Set to a Different Beat [VIDEO]

Buy Akira's Hip Hop Shop! Sunday morning channel surfing while multi-tasking brought this gem of an independent short film to my television. Akira’s Hip Hop Shop is about an interracial relationship that’s rarely talked about let alone became the focus of a film. Asian male – black female couples are very rarely seen. This blog post is not about the sociological reasons why that coupling is not seen as frequently as Black male – Asian female couples or any other combination of couples.

Akira (James Kyson Lee) is faced with many daunting choices in addition to his love for Daphne (Emayatzy Corinealdi). Family pressures and ultimatums weigh heavily on his decisions regarding his relationship with Daphne and commitment to fulfilling his personal dreams and aspirations. Daphne is forced to  decide how she will live out her dreams.

Outside of the Asian male-black female, the movie is much of the same old things --- stereotypes about sex and disapproving family and friends. While Akira and Daphne are of different ethnic backgrounds, their similar interests in music and Asian culture make for refreshing dialog. They also find they are a lot more similar than different.

This is a short film. The full-length version of the movie (37 minutes) is available on and fills in the gaps of the shortened version but you still want more of this film. I don’t want to spoil the movie if you haven’t seen it; if you like romantic comedy with a little drama, check out Akira’s Hip Hop Shop.

Get Akira's Hip Hop Shop now!

Official Trailer: Akira’s Hip Hop Shop

Official Website: Akira’s Hip Hop Shop

Rent it or buy it online: Akira’s Hip Hop Shop

Follow Akira’s Hip Hop Shop on Twitter.